BMW Formula E Favorite Tag Is Just Audi Smokescreen

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Formula E Season Opener Now Just Days Away Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 14, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Formula E: Jaguar I-Pace E Trophy Challenge Video BMW motorsport boss Jens Marquardt reckons Audi labeled his outfit the 2018/19 ABB FIA Formula E pre-season favorite because it “wants to distract” its rivals.center_img But Marquardt dismissed that suggestion as he believes Audi and the DS Techeetah squad “are the ones who set the tone”.“The tests in Valencia were very promising,” Marquardt said at BMW’s end of year celebration. “Although everyone knows that you always have to be careful with results during tests. But we were reliable – that was very important.“We could always keep up with the pace of the frontrunners, [which was] also very important.“But you have to approach the series with respect, because it’s a top level. You have to approach it with respect. That’s what we’ll do.“Allan McNish said last week that we were the favourites. Thanks, but he just wants to distract from the fact that Audi and Techeetah are the ones who set the tone.“I wouldn’t write off [Audi customer team] Virgin and HWA either. They have always shown that they can be very fast at a top level.”Marquardt added that he believes BMW still needs to work on improvements ahead of the start of FE’s fifth season, which gets underway at the Ad Diriyah E-Prix in Saudi Arabia this weekend.“If we can go anywhere from the beginning and be competitive, then we’re doing a good job,” he said.“But we’ll look at that next weekend. We certainly still have work to do. Antonio [Felix da Costa] is a very experienced pilot, but for Alexander [Sims] it is the first season.” Formula E Ad Diriyah Track Reveal: Video Audi team principal Allan McNish told Motorsport.com that BMW is “the one that we are going to be chasing as a principal point”, after the Munich-based marque topped all three days of pre-season testing at Valencia in October.More Formula E Newslast_img read more

Elon Musk Spills Some New Details On Tesla Battery Module Cost

first_imgDurability of a commercial truck and affordable replacement costsElon Musk shared new details about the durability of the Tesla Model 3 powertrain and batteries, as well as replacement cost of the battery modules.First of all, the entire car was designed for durability, like it would be if it was a commercial vehicle:“Model 3 drive unit & body is designed like a commercial truck for a million mile life.”The battery modules alone would be good for about 1,500 charging cycles, which translates to 300,000-500,000 miles (480,000-800,000 km) of mileage depending on battery versions (Standard Range – Long Range).” Current battery modules should last 300k to 500k miles (1500 cycles). Replacing modules (not pack) will only cost $5k to $7k.” Deep Dive Into Tesla Model 3 Price Changes: What’s Going On Here? If we multiply the expected EPA range of 325 miles (in the case of latest Model 3 Long Range RWD) by 1,500 we would get 487,500, which is close to the 500,000 miles. It suggests that we are talking about 1,500 100% Deep-of-Discharge (DOD) cycles.The battery capacity fade for those who drive a lot could cause the necessity to replace some of the battery modules (four) instead of the entire pack. The expected cost is $5,000-$7,000 (per module, we assume), probably also depending on the type (Standard Range or Long Range).Model 3 drive unit & body is designed like a commercial truck for a million mile life. Current battery modules should last 300k to 500k miles (1500 cycles). Replacing modules (not pack) will only cost $5k to $7k.— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 13, 2019 Tesla Model 3 Standard Range Plus Orders Open In Europe, China Tesla Model 3center_img Tesla Announces Model 3 Leasing, Autopilot Now Standard Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 13, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

In May 2019 BMW Group PlugIn EV Car Sales Increased By Almost

first_imgIn total, BMW Group (BMW and MINI brands) sold more than 400,000 plug-in electric cars since November 2013.Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

Wards men set Leeds a tall order

first_imgLeeds United Share on Messenger Shares00 League One Share on Pinterest Share on Facebook First published on Mon 12 May 2008 20.35 EDT Share on Facebook Jeremy Cross at Elland Road League One Share on Twitter Ward’s men set Leeds a tall order Mon 12 May 2008 20.35 EDTcenter_img Carlisle League One 2007-08 Share via Email Share on Twitter Gary McAllister backed his Leeds players to come from behind at Brunton Park on Thursday and maintain their dream of a quick return to the Championship, despite his side’s shock home defeat to Carlisle in last night’s first leg.Goals from Danny Graham and Marc Bridge-Wilkinson handed the Cumbrians the advantage, even though Dougie Freedman’s stoppage-time effort gives Leeds hope. “That keeps us in the tie, although I think at 2-0 we were still capable of going up there and getting a result,” McAllister said.”I’ve a feeling this tie will go right down to the final minute. I’ve got to applaud the effort of my players and the way they kept going. We had some good possession but the end-product wasn’t quite there. Carlisle played well and deserved their victory, but it’s still game on.”John Ward’s side refused to be intimidated by a crowd of more than 36,000 and having threatened to take the lead in the seventh minute, when Bridge-Wilkinson struck an upright, they eventually did so in the 32nd. A poor clearance from Leeds allowed Simon Hackney to charge on to the loose ball and unleash a powerful volley which deflected past Casper Ankergren off Graham’s backside.The home side’s evening went from bad to worse five minutes after the interval when Carlisle doubled their advantage, Bridge-Wilkinson sweeping home Evan Horwood’s cross to leave McAllister’s men with a mountain to climb.The first step was taken in the sixth minute of injury-time when a goalmouth scramble culminated in Freedman bundling the ball home from close range.”I’m delighted with the way the game has gone,” Ward said afterwards. “To score twice and have a goal start in the return leg is fantastic, but it’s far from finished. We have a lot to do still.” Share on LinkedIn Share on WhatsApp match reports Topics Share via Email Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Friday Roundup

first_img FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available. SEC Chair Clayton on “appropriate settlements,” sentenced, and Odebrecht related. It’s all here in the Friday roundup.“Appropriate Settlements”SEC Chairman Jay Clayton recently released this statement which contains a section titled “Factors That Drive Appropriate Settlements.” In pertinent part, the section states:“It often is noted that the cost of litigation—or, more accurately, avoiding the cost of litigation— is a key driver of settlements. This is undoubtedly correct, as that cost—in terms of dollars as well as other less-tangible factors—can be significant for many defendants.There are, however, other factors that can drive appropriate settlements. One important factor is the demonstrated willingness of the Commission to litigate zealously if a timely and reasonable offer of settlement is not made. When no such offer has been made, I believe we should promptly file an action and pursue all appropriate remedies. Our practice reflects this principle. In addition, we are bolstering, and expect to continue to bolster, our trial and trial-support resources.Another factor that drives appropriate settlements is the importance of promptly remedying harm to investors. Investor protection is at the core of the Commission’s mission and, from the Commission’s perspective, an attractive settlement offer is one that provides appropriate remedial relief, including any return of money to injured investors, more quickly than would be expected in a litigated action. I encourage settling parties to craft their settlement offers with this perspective in mind and also to be flexible and creative to maximize the remedial effects of proposed settlements.A fourth factor that drives appropriate settlements is a desire for certainty. In particular, the ongoing and potential consequences of a litigated action often motivate an entity to pursue a settlement that puts the matter behind it. The Commission’s ability to provide such certainty can be another critical factor in reaching a settlement that is in the best interest of investors. Put simply, the Commission’s willingness to zealously pursue all appropriate remedies often is a strong stick and, at the same time, the ability of the Commission to provide a full and final resolution of a matter often is a significant carrot.Pursuing a settlement agreement that provides certainty can be complex, including because the imposition of certain types of relief by the Commission and other authorities can have significant collateral consequences. For example, remedies such as the imposition of an injunction against future violations of the antifraud provisions of the federal securities laws, or the requirement that an entity undertake to retain an independent compliance consultant, may subject the entity to collateral disqualifications that, as a practical matter, can prohibit the entity from continuing to conduct certain businesses. The effects of these collateral consequences can vary widely depending on the scope of the businesses and operations of the entity and, in practice, range from immaterial to extremely significant. In certain cases, these collateral consequences are wholly appropriate, including to serve important investor protection considerations. In other cases, in whole or in part, they may not be, including because other measures may more appropriately address the conduct at issue and related investor protection considerations.”SentencedAs highlighted in this prior post, in connection with the Ng Lap Seng enforcement action, the DOJ also charged Julia Vivi Wang (a U.S. citizen) with conspiracy to violate the FCPA, a violation of the FCPA, and tax offenses. As alleged in the information, Wang “agreed to pay and offer money and other things of value to foreign officials in the Caribbean … in exchange for and to influence the taking of official action and to secure an improper advantage for Chinese businesses and business people looking to do business in the Caribbean.”As noted here, Wang was recently sentenced to serve three years of probation and ordered to make more than $629,000 of restitution, to include money she was paid by Ng’s interests that she didn’t report to the IRS.Odebrecht RelatedIn this piece, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) goes in-depth into Odebrecht’s bribe-paying division (see here for the prior post regarding the company’s 2016 FCPA enforcement action.”“The Bribery Division, a new investigation led by the ICIJ, reveals that Odebrecht’s cash-for-contracts operation was even bigger than the company has acknowledged, and involved prominent figures and massive public works projects not mentioned in the criminal cases or other official inquiries to date.”This piece focuses on the Miami connections to the bribery scandal. Learn More & Registerlast_img read more

Winston Strawn Advises Cameron on 850 Million Sale

first_img Remember me Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Password The Houston-based company is selling its centrifugal compression business to Irish industrial company, Ingersoll Rand. Non-Texas attorneys from Baker Botts and Simpson Thacher also advised . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Lost your password? Usernamelast_img

Wilfred R Woods Wenatchee World Publisher Dies at 972017 Apple Blossom Festival

first_imgThe Wenatchee World reports the death of globe-trotting reporter, columnist and former publisher, Wilfred R. Woods, who died this weekend at the age of 97. “Wilf” as he preferred to be called, died at home from complications of old age  … The Woods family has owned the newspaper since 1907, Woods retired as publisher in 1997 to serve as chairman of the newspaper’s board of directors.  His son, Rufus, has run the newspaper since that time.last_img

The Pediatric Asthma Yardstick offers guidance to treat children of all ages

first_img Source:https://acaai.org/ Jul 10 2018Although about 10 percent of school-aged children in the United States have asthma, there are few comprehensive U.S. guidelines for treating pediatric asthma. The Pediatric Asthma Yardstick, a new guideline from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), offers a user-friendly “operational document”. It helps health care professionals understand which controller treatments are right for which age groups and identifies when a step up is needed.”There is nothing like the Pediatric Asthma Yardstick in the current literature,” says allergist Bradley Chipps, MD, ACAAI president and lead author of the paper. “We created the yardstick because there are many options for treating pediatric asthma. It’s a roadmap for how to move forward with kids whose asthma is not under control. The yardstick describes controller treatments at different levels of severity for all ages, the choices available for parents for their child and how to step up therapy.”Related StoriesPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCRevolutionary gene replacement surgery restores vision in patients with retinal degenerationResearch reveals genetic cause of deadly digestive disease in childrenThe diagnosis and management of asthma in children differs from that in adults. Differences also exist between the three age groups addressed in the yardstick – adolescents, 12-18 years old; school-age children, 6-11 years old; infants and young children, 5 years old and under.”Differences in diagnosis and management of asthma in children reflect differences in development of their respiratory systems, particularly for younger children,” says Leonard Bacharier, MD, co-author of the yardstick. “Other factors include challenges related to daily activities and emotional and social concerns, particularly for adolescents. Comorbid conditions and non-adherence with treatment (eg; due to the stigma of having a chronic condition and taking medicine) can affect outcomes for older children.”Although asthma often begins in early childhood, diagnosing asthma in the very young child is challenging because it is based largely on symptoms and is not easily confirmed by objective testing, such as lung function. Additionally, symptoms, notably wheezing and coughing, often are related to, or occur with, common viral infections. Pediatric data for medicines are limited and robust clinical studies attesting to efficacy and safety of asthma medications are few.”The Pediatric Asthma Yardstick is a practical resource for identifying children with uncontrolled asthma who need a step-up in controller medicine,” says Dr Chipps. “It describes how to start and/or adjust controller therapy based on the options that are currently available for children, from infants to 18 years of age. The recommendations are presented around patient profiles, by severity and age, and are based on current best practice strategies according to the most recent data and the authors’ clinical experience.”last_img read more

NCCN updates Clinical Practice Guidelines to include new recommendations for CABOMETYX tablets

first_img Source:http://ir.exelixis.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=120923&p=RssLanding&cat=news&id=2366537 Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 7 2018Exelixis, Inc. today announced that the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) updated its Clinical Practice Guidelines to include new recommendations for CABOMETYX® (cabozantinib) tablets. With the updates, CABOMETYX is recommended by the NCCN for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) regardless of patient risk status (favorable-, intermediate-, and poor-risk).Key CABOMETYX-related highlights from the updated NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines for Kidney Cancer include: Related StoriesAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis system”CABOMETYX is the only TKI indicated for the treatment of advanced kidney cancer with NCCN-preferred status for intermediate- and poor-risk groups in the first-line setting and the only TKI with preferred status for patients who have progressed on prior therapy,” said Michael M. Morrissey, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Exelixis. “We welcome these updated recommendations, which recognize the significance of the CABOSUN trial data included in our label as an important advance in the care of patients with this disease.”The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines are the recognized standard for clinical policy in cancer care and are developed through review of evidence and recommendations from physicians and oncology researchers. The NCCN kidney cancer panel’s decision to include CABOMETYX as a Category 2A preferred option for the treatment of patients with previously untreated advanced RCC with poor- or intermediate-risk disease was based on the results of the phase 2 CABOSUN trial.Additionally, in its recent update to the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hepatobiliary Cancers, the NCCN added cabozantinib as a Category 1 option for the treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (Child-Pugh Class A only) who have been previously treated with sorafenib. CABOMETYX is not FDA-approved for previously treated advanced HCC. On May 29, 2018, the U.S. FDA accepted the supplemental New Drug Application for CABOMETYX in previously treated advanced HCC and assigned it a Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) action date of January 14, 2019.center_img CABOMETYX is the only preferred tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment option for first-line patients in the poor- and intermediate-risk groups (Category 2A) CABOMETYX is a recommended first-line treatment option for favorable-risk patients (Category 2B) CABOMETYX is the only preferred TKI treatment option for previously treated patients (Category 1)last_img read more

EU research chief candidate passes first test

first_imgBRUSSELS—Carlos Moedas, the commissioner-designate for research, has won over European parliamentarians in a public hearing here today. A former secretary of state in Portugal with no research policy background, Moedas came across as competent and well-prepared—but the plans he presented for his possible 5-year term remain vague, observers say.Moedas, an engineer with an MBA from Harvard University, has experience in water management, real estate, and investment banking. He is best known in Portugal for overseeing the country’s bailout program, negotiated with the “troika” (the European Commission, the European Central Bank, and the International Monetary Fund) after the economic crisis.However, he seems to have immersed himself in his new subject in the 2 weeks since his appointment was announced. Today, before members of Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE), Moedas displayed a good understanding of science policy trends and of Horizon 2020, the bloc’s 7-year, €80 billion research funding program, which started this year. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country In general, he stuck to the European Commission’s usual line, focusing on the need to boost innovation and public-private partnerships, and mentioning the importance of results and “output indicators.” “Europe is [good] at turning euros into knowledge, but then it’s [not good] at turning that knowledge into money, euros, profit,” the former banker said in French. (During the 3-hour hearing, Moedas segued from Portuguese to English, with dabs of French and Spanish thrown in.)Yet Moedas also presented himself as a firm believer in the value of fundamental research, including social sciences and the humanities, a defender of the freedom of scientists, and a “strong supporter” of the European Research Council. “I believe in public investment in research and innovation,” he stated, adding that he would be the “torchbearer” for science in the new commission. Moedas also pledged to be “ferocious” when pushing member states to do their part—in particular to complete the European Research Area (a much-delayed project to allow the free circulation of knowledge and scientists within the union).He pegged himself as an “implementation man” with a focus on “delivery, delivery, and delivery.” That attitude makes good sense at this point in time, says Peter Tindemans, secretary-general of the researchers’ organization Euroscience: With Horizon 2020 now settled and under way, “nothing visionary is expected” of Moedas, at least until the program’s midterm review in 2017.But Moedas remained “quite vague on how to deliver,” said Dan Nica, ITRE’s coordinator for the center-left group of socialists and democrats, in a statement after the hearing. Left-wing members of the European Parliament also challenged Moedas’s ability to act as a research champion, when the bailout program and reforms that he helped roll out at home “asphyxiated” Portuguese science, in the words of Marisa Matias, a left-wing member of Parliament (MEP) and sociologist from Portugal.In a more personal vein, Moedas appeared polite, mild, and cautious; some observers say his apparent eagerness to please all sides lacks a bit of bite. Born in 1970, he is one of the youngest commissioners-designate; he struck a chord with MEPs by describing himself as a true European, having met his wife in Paris while two of his children were born in London. “Erasmus was one of the defining moments in my life,” he said, referring to the European Union’s flagship student exchange program, which allowed him to study in France. Sounding a tad emotional, he added that becoming a commissioner would allow him “to serve and give back to Europe.”Moedas has already convinced ITRE’s coordinators, who gave his candidacy a (still unofficial) green light in a meeting this afternoon. The committee’s official evaluation letter will be issued next week, before the whole chamber votes on the entire slate of proposed commissioners on 22 October.last_img read more

Stellar merger caused 17th century cosmic explosion

first_imgIn 1670, a Carthusian monk named Père Dom Anthelme discovered a “new star,” or nova, near the constellation Cygnus, pointing out to his fellow monks a star that did not appear on maps of the sky. Now, as astronomers report online today in Nature, this nova, CK Vulpeculae, had an unusual cause: The explosion probably occurred when two stars orbiting each other spiraled together and merged into one. New observations reveal molecules in the gas surrounding the merged star (white and yellow show the brightest glow at visible wavelengths; green contours indicate carbon monoxide gas). The molecules contain lots of isotopes that arise during nuclear reactions, so they likely spilled out of the stellar interiors when the stars joined together. Astronomers have recently discovered that rare “red novae”—named for their color—result when stars merge; now the aftermath of the 17th century nova indicates what such stellar mergers look like centuries later.last_img read more

NSF should help build massive telescope in Hawaii says senior appropriator

first_imgCulberson, who chairs NSF’s spending panel in the U.S. House of Representatives, would like to speed up that timetable. “NSF is not yet a partner, and they should be,” he told ScienceInsider today after his panel marked up a bill that would set NSF’s 2016 budget. “I intend to talk to Dr. [France] Córdova about it.” (Córdova is NSF’s director.)Asked whether his intervention meant he was dissatisfied with the current process, Culberson demurred. “I haven’t intervened,” he said. “I think they’re working it out right now, and I don’t want to get in the middle of that other than to encourage them to do so. NSF needs to play a role. After all … using revolutionary technology.”Culberson’s comments were welcomed by Gary Sanders, TMT project manager at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. “I’m delighted,” Sanders says. “I think TMT is a wonderful opportunity for the U.S. astronomy community.”That community is already solidly behind the project, which would sit atop Mauna Kea on Hawaii’s Big Island. A 2011 decadal survey of the field by the National Research Council of the U.S. National Academies ranked a giant segmented-mirror telescope as one of its top three priorities for ground-based optical and infrared astronomy. The report recommended the United States pay for 25% of construction of either TMT or its competitor, the Giant Magellan Telescope, which would sit atop Cerro Las Campanas in Chile. The panel also recommended NSF eventually spend a similar amount in equipping or operating the second telescope.Researchers hope to start construction of TMT soon and have it completed by 2024. The work is now on hold, as Native Hawaiian protesters have blocked the road to the construction site.Culberson doesn’t expect those protests to pose a significant obstacle. “I’m confident that NSF and the local authorities will work things out,” he says.*Correction, 15 May, 2:36 p.m.: The priority ranking given to a giant segemented-mirror telescope by the 2011 decadal survey has been corrected. It was given third priority, not first, primarily because other projects were more “mature.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email Representative John Culberson (R–TX) says he’s not butting in. But he wants the National Science Foundation (NSF) to pay a significant share of the $1.55 billion cost of a massive telescope to be built in Hawaii.The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) is the dream of a consortium of universities, foundations, and national observatories in the United States, Canada, China, India, and Japan. It would be one of the world’s largest optical telescopes. The consortium has raised between 75% and 80% of what’s needed and has long hoped NSF would be a major backer. But the agency has yet to commit. In 2013, it gave the TMT consortium a 5-year, $1.25 million grant to study how the agency might participate in the international project, an effort that could lead to a formal proposal to the agency in 2017.NSF created new rules for vetting proposed large new facilities in the 1990s after scientists complained that the agency’s existing approach was not transparent and didn’t make clear what was expected of them. However, the process, which includes meeting several interim deadlines, can take many years from start to finish.last_img read more

How to see a supernova twice

first_imgFinding a supernova—the huge explosion that marks the death of a star—in a distant galaxy is lucky enough, but one group of astronomers also got the bonus of an instant replay, thanks to gravity. The team first witnessed the supernova last year, as it exploded behind a massive cluster of galaxies 5 billion light-years from Earth called MACS J1149.5+2223. They noticed four images of the same supernova arranged around a galaxy in what is known as an “Einstein cross.” This lensing effect happens when the gravity of a galaxy bends the light of an object behind it so that, from Earth, we see four images of the same object. The team realized that other galaxies in the cluster might be gravitationally lensing light from the same supernova. But, as the light would follow different paths, it would take more or less time to reach Earth. So they set out to carefully model all the matter, conventional and dark, in the galaxy cluster to predict when and where lensed images of the supernova might appear (pictured). One appearance, they calculated, must have happened in 1998, but no telescopes were watching. Another one, they reckoned, was due to happen just about now. On 11 December, the Hubble Space Telescope struck oil: An image of the same supernova appeared just as predicted, the first time such an event has been successfully forecast. The sighting is also a powerful demonstration of astronomers’ ability to model the effect of gravitational mass on light.last_img read more

Contagious cancer found in clams and mussels

first_imgAs bad as cancer is in humans, at least it’s not contagious. The same can’t be said for clams, mussels, and other marine bivalves. According to a new study, published online today in Nature, these creatures can suffer from a form of cancer similar to leukemia that appears to be transmitted through the water and can pass not only between members of one species, but even between two different ones. Genetic analyses revealed that, even in different mussels (pictured above), cancer cells were much more similar to each other than to healthy host cells, suggesting that the cancer hadn’t originally developed in host mussel tissue, but may have come from a common outside source. The cockles revealed a similar story, but showed evidence of two distinct lineages of cancer cells that evolved separately over time. The golden carpet shell clams told the most interesting tale of all: Again, dissimilarities between the host cells and the cancerous cells gave the appearance that the cancer cells were from an outside source, but this time the differences were so pronounced that the cancer cells looked much more like host cells from an entirely different species of clam—the pullet carpet shell (Venerupis corrugata). The team concludes that the cancer mutations initially arose in V. corrugata, but crossed species to Polititapes aureus at some point. For the bivalves at least, the results suggest that cancer acts like a new type of infectious agent, similar in many ways to traditional pathogens that continually evolve new genetic tweaks that allow them to survive and reproduce. This type of transmissible cancer has also been discovered in several mammals including Tasmanian devils and certain breeds of dogs. The new results in bivalves, the authors suggest, show that some animals are more susceptible to phenomenon, but humans are in the clear—at least, so far.*Correction, 23 June, 10:06 a.m.: This item originally stated that contagious cancer was seen in “certain species of dogs.” We have corrected the item to read “certain breeds of dogs.”last_img read more

Survey finds laissezfaire attitude toward validating antibodies

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Last summer, 504 researchers filled out an online survey conducted by the Global Biological Standards Institute (GBSI), a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. More than half said they had never received training on the importance of validating research antibodies, nor instructions on how to do it. (The respondents ranged from undergraduates to senior researchers and included graduate students, postdocs, laboratory technicians, and junior faculty members.)More than 70% of the respondents said that validating antibodies takes too much time.  But “the consequences of not validating are so much bigger,” asserts Alison Banham, a cancer researcher at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. “Actually, if you haven’t validated your antibody and your hypothesis is wrong, the time you might spend exploring that and having to solve those issues are probably considerably more time investment than you actually validating the antibody. And that is without considering the reputational risk that you have of publishing something that’s wrong.”Antibodies are an essential element in biomedical research labs, with some researchers using up to 100 different types annually. Nearly 60% said they rely on commercial suppliers for the majority of their antibodies, at a cost that may exceed $10,000 a year. Such expansive antibody use left Anderson and others baffled by what the survey suggests is a laissez-faire attitude toward validation.Roughly 85% of respondents said they have validated at least some of the antibodies they use. But the percentages are much lower depending on the years a scientist has used antibodies and where they get them from. Only 22% of early-career scientists bother to validate antibodies made in-house, and 57% of them give commercially made antibodies a pass. Even among senior scientists, nearly a quarter don’t validate commercial antibodies, and 39% don’t make sure their own pass muster. Young scientists are more likely than their senior colleagues (27% to 16.5%) to feel that validation is not even necessary.That faith may be misplaced, as there is a lot that can go wrong while using an antibody. Beyond simply tagging the wrong substance, it could bind to more than one target or to none at all. Many antibodies are created in controlled conditions. If a scientist’s experiment changed the structure of the protein they are searching for, it’s possible the antibody would not be able to bind to the protein. Commercially produced antibodies (the source of most antibodies used by researchers) pose another set of potential problems. For starters, they come with no standard amount of information. The same antibody may be sold by two companies under different names, Banham says, and it is often unclear if or how the company validated them.Getting researchers to validate will require changing a culture that values speedy purchases that can be accepted at face value, says Sharon Milgram, the director of NIH’s Office of Intramural Training & Education (OITE). Milgram works with 5000 scientists who range from high school students to postdoctoral fellows, and she says that getting the “right” answer quickly is a high priority for them. “Maybe we really need to encourage students to question every reagent they get, whether it be from somebody at a company, from somebody who sent it to them, or from their colleague who sits at the next bay and handed it to them,” she said. “I think it would be asking a lot of a vulnerable population working in a hierarchy. But these data make me think that maybe we need to have that discussion.”The OITE provides one-stop shopping on career advice, networking training, and ethical guidance. But because the program is open to all research fields, Milgram says, the training on research ethics and reproducibility is presented in broad strokes. The trainees are told to talk to their principal investigators (PIs) about situations unique to their field, so if a trainee is in a lab that uses antibodies, the PI should be explaining why and how to validate. But the survey results could indicate those conversations are not happening, she says. “As a community, we need to not only educate the students. We also need to educate the PIs on how profound their influence can be.”The problem may be deeply rooted, she adds. Only 44% of researchers with more than 10 years of experience validated antibodies “obtained from another source,” such as a fellow researcher who shares a reagent. Milgram said she could readily imagine that a young researcher taught never to question a superior might never question a colleague after establishing their own lab.Establishing clear standards seems like an obvious first step. Past attempts to create standards have been “too complicated and ambitious,” says Leonard Freedman, GBSI president and lead author of the paper analyzing the survey. But Freedman hopes that a group of researchers, journal editors, and biotech company executives will be able to do exactly that at a GBSI-sponsored meeting in September. He jokes that he plans to lock the doors until consensus is reached. Even if that dramatic strategy succeeds, however, participants will need to come up with a way to get labs to follow the standards they have adopted.Freedman would like researchers to adopt voluntary guidelines, although others say that it will take grant funders and journals to enforce the rules. NIH’s new grant guidelines require researchers to explain how they plan to validate, and Anderson says the pressure to follow guidelines will come from peer reviewers and journals that require sufficient validation. Either way, the survey results indicate that scientists in every stage of their careers must become involved.“I would say this is not just an issue of younger investigators, because they need mentors,” Anderson says. “The application of rigorous research methods is really the responsibility of the whole community working together.” Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country James Anderson studies how epithelial cells that act as barriers within cells, tissue, or organs are bound together. In his lab at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on the Bethesda, Maryland, campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the cell biologist uses antibodies to tag the proteins he and his colleagues are looking for, but only after making sure they are labeling with the proper antibody. To do without such baseline information, the entire experiment could be irreproducible.“It’s not just the protein you buy in a tube from a vendor that can vary,” he says. “It’s also the protocol you use in your own lab, the solutions, the pHs, the ionic strengths, and the different applications. The validation of each antibody can turn into a small research project in itself.”Outside the lab, Anderson’s primary job is to lead the Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives within the NIH Office of the Director.  And in that capacity he must deal with an emerging crisis in the global biomedical research—an inability to replicate experimental results. A key component of this so-called reproducibility crisis is the failure of antibodies to perform as promised. One reason they fail, according to a new survey, is that fewer of his research colleagues are following in his footsteps and validating the antibodies they are using.last_img read more

Ancient trilobites may have released sperm and eggs from their heads

first_imgAncient trilobites may have released sperm and eggs from their heads Trilobites—three-sectioned, crablike critters that dominated the early Paleozoic—are so abundant that they have become the gateway fossil for most collectors. But paleontologists have found little evidence of how the extinct arthropods reproduced—until now. Researchers studying a fossil specimen of the trilobite Triarthrus eatoni spotted something odd just next to the animal’s head: a collection of small (about 200 micrometers across), round objects (in light blue, above). Those, they determined, are actually eggs—the first time anyone had observed fossil trilobite eggs right next to the critters themselves. The structures were exceptionally well preserved, the eggs and exoskeletons of the trilobites replaced with an iron sulfide ore called pyrite. They came from the Lorraine Group, a rock formation that spans much of the northeastern United States and dates to the Ordovician period (about 485 million to 444 million years ago); it has long been a mecca for trilobite hunters because of the pyritization. The placement of the eggs is suggestive, the researchers report in the March issue of Geology: They hypothesize that trilobites released their eggs and sperm through a genital pore somewhere in the head—much like modern horseshoe crabs do today. One possible reason for the rarity of the find may be that the brooding behavior of T. eatoni was relatively unusual in the trilobite world: The species tended to prefer a harsh, low-oxygen environment, and may have kept a closer eye on their eggs than other trilobite species. But, the authors note, one idea this finding does lay to rest is that trilobites might reproduce via copulation—a titillating but little-regarded hypothesis based on the fact that trilobites are sometimes found clustered on top of one another. Instead, trilobites were most likely spawners—and, in fact, that clustering behavior may be another parallel to horseshoe crabs, which can climb on top of one another in competition to fertilize released eggs. By Carolyn GramlingFeb. 23, 2017 , 4:30 PMlast_img read more

Scientists thought ancient Egyptian mummies didnt have any DNA left They were

first_img Scientists thought ancient Egyptian mummies didn’t have any DNA left. They were wrong Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country bpk/Aegyptisches Museum und Papyrussammlung, SMB/Sandra Steiss Scientists successfully sequenced DNA from mummies from the site of Abusir el-Meleq, one of which was buried in this sarcophagus. Krause, who has studied the DNA of Neandertals, Denisovans, and prehistoric migrants to Europe, recently gravitated toward ancient Egyptian mummies because of the empire’s tumultuous political history. At various points, it was conquered by Assyrians from the Near East, Nubians from farther south along the Nile, Persians, Greeks, and Romans, among others. “Our question was, did those foreign conquests have a genetic impact?” Krause says.Krause turned to a collection of 151 mummy heads from the ancient settlement of Abusir el-Meleq, about 100 kilometers south of Cairo along the Nile. The settlement was devoted to Osiris, the god of the dead, making it a popular burial spot for many centuries. The heads were excavated (and removed from their bodies) in the early 20th century and now reside in two collections in Germany, at the University of Tübingen and Berlin’s Museum of Prehistory and Early History. Radiocarbon dating shows that the mummies span 1300 years of ancient Egyptian history, during many of the foreign conquests and then Egypt’s incorporation into first the Greek and then the Roman empires.Whereas the mummies’ soft tissue contained almost no DNA, the bones and teeth were chock full of genetic material. Ninety of the mummies yielded DNA once housed in mitochondria, the power plants of cells. Mitochondria carry only a few genes, but they are so plentiful that it’s often easier to find their DNA than the single full human genome in a cell’s nucleus. Still, because mitochondrial DNA is passed down from mother to child, it leaves out the story of the father’s DNA. The nuclear genome, which contains DNA from both parents, is far more informative. Unfortunately, Krause says, only a few of the mummies’ nuclear genomes were well preserved, and even fewer passed his strict contamination tests. His team ended up with nuclear genome samples from only three mummies, each from a different time period.Krause’s team compared the mummies’ mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to ancient and modern populations in the Near East and Africa. They discovered that ancient Egyptians closely resembled ancient and modern Near Eastern populations, especially those in the Levant. What’s more, the genetics of the mummies remained remarkably consistent even as different powers conquered the empire. It’s possible that the mitochondrial genomes simply don’t record the genetic contributions of foreign fathers, says Yehia Gad, a molecular geneticist at the National Research Centre in Cairo and a founder of the Egyptian Museum’s ancient DNA lab who worked with Zink on past mummy studies. But the three mummies with nuclear genome data also show striking genetic continuity, Krause points out.Later, however, something did alter the genomes of Egyptians. Although the mummies contain almost no DNA from sub-Saharan Africa, some 15% to 20% of modern Egyptians’ mitochondrial DNA reflects sub-Saharan ancestry. “It’s really unexpected that we see this very late shift,” Krause says. He suspects increased trade along the Nile—including the slave trade—or the spread of Islam in the Middle Ages may have intensified contact between Northern and sub-Saharan Africa.Geneticist Iosif Lazaridis of Harvard Medical School in Boston, who studies how and when ancient populations mixed, calls the new results “a big accomplishment.” But he wonders how representative Abusir el-Meleq is of ancient Egypt as a whole. “Egypt is a big place,” he says. Other regions may have experienced its conquests in different ways, some perhaps with more genetic mixing. But Lazaridis hopes for more revelations to come. “Now that it’s been proven that it’s possible to sample from mummies—well, there are literally thousands of mummies.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img By Lizzie WadeMay. 30, 2017 , 11:00 AM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Ancient Egyptian mummies preserve many details of the deceased: facial features, signs of illness, even tattoos. But not, it seemed, DNA. After trying repeatedly to extract it, many scientists were convinced that the hot desert climate and, perhaps, the chemicals used in mummification destroyed any genetic material long ago. Now, a team of ancient DNA specialists has successfully sequenced genomes from 90 ancient Egyptian mummies. The game-changing results give scientists their first insight into the genetics of ordinary ancient Egyptians—which changed surprisingly little through centuries of conquests.The sequencing success, reported this week in Nature Communications, “finally proves to everyone that there’s DNA preserved in ancient Egyptian mummies,” says Albert Zink, a biological anthropologist at the Institute for Mummy Studies in Bolzano, Italy. He participated in a 2010 study that identified DNA sequences from 16 ancient Egyptian royal mummies, including Tutankhamun. But that study used polymerase chain reaction, a method that efficiently finds and extracts targeted DNA fragments but cannot always reliably distinguish between ancient DNA and modern contamination.The new study, led by Johannes Krause, a geneticist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, used next-generation sequencing methods to read stretches of any DNA present in a sample and fish out those that resembled human DNA. The complete reads allowed the team to spot tell-tale damage patterns associated only with ancient DNA. That makes the new analysis much more reliable, says Hannes Schroeder, an ancient DNA researcher at the University of Copenhagen. “It succeeds where previous studies on Egyptian mummies have failed or fallen short.” Emaillast_img read more

One of the loudest underwater sounds is made by an animal you

first_img The physical act of reproduction can be a noisy affair for many animals, but for the Gulf corvina (Cynoscion othonopterus), it’s downright deafening. Every spring, millions of the snowboard-size gray fish migrate to the Colorado River delta and sync their spawning to the tides and the phases of the moon. The aggregation can span tens of kilometers, and scientists believe male corvinas—like crickets or frogs—make a throaty croaking noise to communicate with potential mates. Over the course of 4 days in the spring of 2014, researchers used sonar and underwater microphones to record where the fish were and the sounds they were making. At the loudest, the instruments recorded the chorusing fish at more than 150 decibels, the team reports today in Biology Letters. That makes the sound the loudest ever recorded for a fish, and one of the loudest sounds ever captured underwater. The collective clicking is so noisy, in fact, that the researchers say it could harm the hearing of other marine animals like seals and whales. Fortunately, it only happens once a year. By David ShultzDec. 19, 2017 , 7:01 PM One of the loudest underwater sounds is made by an animal you wouldn’t expectlast_img read more

Shapeshifting tissue folds into bowls coils and ripples

first_img By Robert F. ServiceDec. 28, 2017 , 12:00 PM Whether they’re in the brain or intestines, many tissues are programmed to bend, twist, and fold in specific ways. Now, scientists have harnessed this programming to create bowls, coils, and ripples out of living tissues that fold themselves up. To do so, the researchers started with plugs of cells taken from a connective tissue in mouse embryos. Called the mesenchyme, this tissue contains cell layers that either stretch or pinch together. When a pinching layer sits above a stretching layer, the two together cause the tissue to bend inward like a bow. Using a 3D printer, the researchers patterned sets of cell plugs in a culture dish filled with a gel containing tiny fibers made of extracellular matrix, a structural support naturally secreted by cells in the body. And by choosing which way they knew each set of cells would bend, they caused the overall collection of tissue to fold up into the variety of preprogrammed shapes seen in the image above, the team reports today in Developmental Cell. Eventually, researchers hope to use this strategy to engineer more natural tissues and organs able to replace those in lost in people because of age or disease. ALEX HUGHES center_img Shapeshifting tissue folds into bowls, coils, and rippleslast_img read more

Cancer researcher at The Ohio State University resigns following multiple misconduct findings

first_img A cancer researcher has resigned from The Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus after the institution determined he had committed misconduct in eight papers. His work in designing anticancer compounds had led to millions of dollars in funding and multiple patents, as well as two compounds in clinical trials.According to a 75-page report released today by OSU, a committee determined that cancer scientist Ching-Shih Chen was guilty of “deviating from the accepted practices of image handling and figure generation and intentionally falsifying data” in 14 instances in eight papers. The report recommends that Chen work with co-authors and journals to produce an “immediate retraction” of those eight papers, published between 2006 and 2014.The investigation also prompted OSU to temporarily shut down research involving a compound developed by Chen; a phase Ib trial was suspended in June 2017. “Patient safety was never compromised,” according to the university.  The Ohio State University’s campus in Columbus iStock.com/aceshot Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Chen joined OSU in 2001; prior to that, he held faculty positions at the University of Kentucky in Lexington and the University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown. While at OSU, where he earned more than $200,000 per year, Chen did not keep a low profile: He held the position of Lucius A. Wing chair of cancer research and therapy, and in 2010 received the “Innovator of the Year award” from OSU. He has obtained more than $8 million in funding from the U.S. National Institutes of Health over the course of his career and published nearly 200 papers.Chen holds multiple patents, the last one granted in March 2017. The company that was granted exclusive rights to the anticancer agents developed by Chen, Arno Therapeutics in Flemington, New Jersey, declared it was dissolving late last year.According to a spokesperson for Arno Therapeutics, the problems with Chen’s papers had “zero impact” on the company’s drug development efforts. “We did separate clinical studies ourselves,” the spokesperson said, adding that the company decided to dissolve because of a “product failure in another therapeutic area. … Our decision had nothing to do with any internal activities at OSU.”The university “hired an external consultant who validated that Chen’s research misconduct did not affect the Arno licensed compounds developed in his lab,” according to a statement from OSU released today.Misconduct allegations in 2016Chen resigned from OSU in September 2017. One month earlier, he stepped down as director of the Institute of Biological Chemistry in Taiwan; the institute still maintains a website for him, listing him as a “distinguished research fellow.” His attorney, David Ball of Rosenberg & Ball in Granville, Ohio, did not immediately return requests for comment.According to the report, the investigation was prompted by allegations of misconduct in early 2016, involving six papers. The more the university investigated, the more potential issues it uncovered. The report notes: “In some cases, Dr. Chen indicated that there were no laboratory notebooks kept by members of the lab, rather individuals only had weekly progress reports and no daily records of the experiments they conducted.”The university says it has “disclosed Chen’s investigation to appropriate federal authorities,” including the U.S. Office of Research Integrity (ORI) at the Department of Health and Human Services. If the ORI agrees that misconduct has occurred, it will issue its own findings, and a potential sanction, against Chen. Often, ORI findings are the first time a case of misconduct is revealed. OSU—which has been involved in a number of high-profile cases in the past few years, and hired a law firm to review its handling of such cases—says it wanted to alert the community once its report was finalized.“On this case, with the strength of the evidence, the clear admission of misconduct by the researcher, and with the federal ORI’s understanding and awareness, the university was able to proactively share the investigation and results with the community,” Jennifer Yucel, OSU’s associate vice president for research compliance and the research integrity officer, told Retraction Watch and Science.The documents released by OSU include an evaluation from The Weinberg Group—which consults on drug regulation—of the validity of multiple potential drugs related to a compound described in Chen’s papers, AR-42. Some of the evidence used to support AR-42—which works by inhibiting an enzyme that modifies histones (histone deacetylase)—includes four papers that contain “irregularities” in some of the data supporting AR-42. The outside experts concluded that the investigational new drugs remain “scientifically valid” even without the four papers, and the suspended trial “may be resumed without any risk to patients associated with the removed publications.”For three papers, published between 2004 and 2014, the university recommended Chen contact the journals to issue corrections. “In the event that figures cannot be corrected with verified original research records, then retractions will be required.” The eight papers slated for retraction have been collectively cited more than 300 times, according to Clarivate Analytics.This story is a product of a collaboration between Science and Retraction Watch. By Alison McCook, Retraction WatchMar. 30, 2018 , 3:00 PMcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Cancer researcher at The Ohio State University resigns following multiple misconduct findingslast_img read more

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